pdf file Download this section

This section contains information about the Housing Register, Tenure, Housing Stock, Accessible Homes, Overcrowding and Rent Levels. Further information on Homelessness and Temporary Accommodation is available in the People Chapter.

A detailed picture of the nature of housing in Enfield can help us to better understand the characteristics of the Borough’s population. This understanding demonstrates significant geographic variations between households, with a divide between the experiences of those in the east of the Borough and those in the west.

Households on the Housing Register in Enfield, by Ward: March 2012

Households on the Housing Register
Enlarge the Households on the Housing Register graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

The Housing Register is a list of all applicants who have applied for, and who qualify for, council or housing association properties via the Choice Based Lettings System. In Enfield there is a serious shortage of properties, and as a result very few people registering for housing succeed in obtaining council housing.

Of the ten wards with the most households on the Register, all ten are found in the east of the Borough. Edmonton Green has the highest number of individuals, with 718 applicants on the Register – equivalent to 9% of all applicants, whilst Grange ward has the fewest, with 89 applicants – equivalent to 1.1% of all applicants.

Housing Register in Enfield - Overcrowded Households: 2010-2012

Housing Register - Overcrowded: 2010-2012
Enlarge the Overcrowded Households graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

As identified by the Housing Register, we see that there is an increasing problem with private sector overcrowding.    

Housing Register in Enfield – Severely Overcrowded Households: 2010 – 2012

Housing Register - Severely Overcrowded: 2010-2012
Enlarge the Severely Overcrowded Households graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

Furthermore, whilst overcrowding is an increasing problem for private rented households, severe overcrowding is also a significantly increasing issue. Severe overcrowding is defined as "a household with at least two less bedrooms than would be expected for the household size". Overcrowding figures include the severely overcrowded households.

Households in Enfield lacking at least 1 bedroom: 2011

Households lacking at least 1 bedroom: 2011
Enlarge the Households lacking at least 1 bedroom map

Source: 2011 Census

Geographic analysis of households shows us that where households are identified as lacking at least 1 bedroom, these tend to be more prominent in the east and the south of the Borough.

Housing Tenure in Enfield, by Ward: 2011

Housing Tenure by Ward:2011
Enlarge the Housing Tenure by Ward graph

Source: 2011 Census

Geographic analysis of housing tenure – the conditions under which a household occupies their home – show us that the proportion of households who own their homes and the proportion of households who are renting their homes (either private rental or social rental) varies significantly by geography.

Of the eleven wards with the lowest level of property ownership, ten are found in the east of the Borough, whilst the proportion of socially rented properties is much lower in western wards.   

All Households in Enfield – Proportion of Social Rented, by Lower Super Output Area: 2011

All Households – Proportion of Social Rented, by LSOA: 2011
Enlarge the map of Socially Rented households

Source: 2011 Census

Looking more closely at the geography of rental trends in Enfield, the south east and north east corners of the Borough tend to have higher proportions of households in socially rented properties.    

All Households in Enfield – Proportion of Private Rented, by Lower Super Output Area: 2011

All Households – Proportion of Private Rented, by LSOA: 2011
Enlarge the map of Private Rented households

Source: 2011 Census

Secondly, private renting habits are more sporadic, with Lower Super Output Areas in the south of the Borough tending to demonstrate higher proportions, although no definitive pattern is observable.

Type of Properties Owned by Enfield Council: March 2010

Type of Properties Owned by Enfield Council: March 2010
Enlarge the Types of Property Owned chart

Source: London Borough of Enfield

As of March 2010, Enfield Council owned 11,573 units. Of these, there were 10,693 General Needs units (housing where no support is provided, except for a normal housing management and repair service) owned by the Council. 480 of these were located in nearby districts, Broxbourne and Hertsmere. The majority of homes owned by Enfield Council were flats, with 8,252 in total. Around two thirds of these flats were low rise (located in a building with 5 floors or less) with one third in high rise buildings (6 floors or more).

Sheltered Accommodation Service, Registered Social Landlord and Private Sector Provision: 2010

Enfield Homes: Location of Sheltered Accommodation: 2013
Enlarge the Map of Locations of Sheltered Accommodation

Source: London Borough of Enfield, GIS Team

Of the Enfield Council owned units in July 2013 to 844 were Sheltered Homes. This is housing which provides independent living for older people, where a support service is available.

Enfield Homes: Sheltered Accommodation: 2013

Locations of Sheltered Accommodation Service, Registered Social Landlord and Private Sector Provision: 2010
Enlarge the Map of Locations of Sheltered Accommodation Service

Source: Enfield Homes

Alongside the Council owned sheltered accommodation, there are also a number of sheltered units provided by either the Private Sector or by Registered Social Landlords. The map above shows the locations of these units in 2010.

Sheltered Demand, by Preferred Lettings Area: 31st January 2013

Sheltered Demand, by Preferred Lettings Area: 31st January 2013
Enlarge the Sheltered Demand, by Preferred Lettings Area graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

Where households are seeking sheltered housing, the area in which demand is greatest varies significantly. Enfield Town has the highest level of demand, with Palmers Green and Oakwood close behind. The lowest levels of demand, for which preference information exists, are for Cheshunt, Bush Hill Park, Potters Bar and other areas outside of the Borough.

Bedroom Size of Properties Owned by Enfield Council: March 2010

Bedroom Size of Properties Owned by Enfield Council: March 2010
Enlarge the Bedroom Size chart

Source: Enfield Allocation Scheme 2013

Broken down by size, the homes owned by Enfield Council are fairly evenly split between Studio and 1 bedroom, 2 bedrooms and 3 bedrooms. There are only a small number of Council owned homes of size 4 bedrooms or more.

Enfield Council Owned Homes, by Ward: March 2010

Enfield Council Owned Homes, by Ward: March 2010
Enlarge the Map of Enfield Council Owned Homes

Source: Enfield Allocation Scheme: 2013

Looking at the geography of homes owned by the Council within the Borough, the majority of properties are located in the east of the Borough. Edmonton Green and Southbury wards have the most properties, whilst the central and western wards have the fewest. The map does not include those properties located in Broxbourne and Hertsmere.

Registered Social Housing Providers

Registered Social Housing Providers
Enlarge the Registered Social Housing Providers chart

Source: Enfield’s Tenancy Strategy 2013 – 2018

Alongside homes owned by the Council, as of November 2012, Registered Social Housing Providers provided a total of 8,411 Social Housing Units in Enfield. These can be broken down into 7,479 Rented Units, 646 Wheelchair Units and 286 Supported Housing Units.

Of these providers, the largest were London and Quadrant (1820 Total Units), Metropolitan Housing Trust(1351), Viridian Housing (482), Notting Hill Housing Trust (488) Christian Action Housing Association (857), Origin (654), Newlon Housing Trust (363), One Housing Association (345), Sanctuary Housing Association (323) Circle Anglia (197) and Anchor Trust (175).

Christian Action Housing Association offers the Borough’s largest Supported Housing Unit resource, with 120 units, Tower Homes has the Borough’s largest Wheelchair Unit resource, with 70 units, and London and Quadrant offers the Borough’s largest Rented Units resource, with 1789 units.

Lettings of Social Rented Homes: 2007/2008 – 2011/2012

Lettings of Social Rented Homes: 2007/08 – 2011/12
Enlarge the Lettings of Social Rented Homes graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

Between 2007/08 and 2011/12 the number of one bedroom properties being let as social rented homes has increased by just over 5%, the number of two bedroom properties has decreased by nearly 19% and the number of three or more bedroom properties has increased by more than 57%.

Demand Groups to Whom Social Rented Homes Were Let: 2007 – 2012 Average

Demand Groups to Whom Social Rented Homes Were Let: 2007 – 2012 Average
Enlarge the Demand Groups to Whom Social Rented Homes Were Let graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

Of those households who are letting social rented homes, there are three distinct categories of household:

  • Homeless (Households accepted as homeless by Enfield Council under the Homelessness legislation before 9 November 2012)
  • Transfers (Transfers of Enfield’s existing Council and housing association tenants)
  • All other Housing Needs

Between 2007 and 2012, over half (51%) of one bedroom properties were let to those with ‘Housing Needs’, just under three quarters (73%) of two bedroom properties to ‘Homeless’ households, and over half (56%) of 3 or more bedroom homes also to ‘Homeless’ households.

Weekly Rent Levels in Enfield: 2011/2012

Weekly Rent Levels in Enfield: 2011/12
Enlarge the Weekly Rent Levels in Enfield graph

Source: Enfield’s Tenancy Strategy 2013-2018

In 2011/12, the average weekly rent for a property in the private sector was two to three times (depending on the property size) that seen in Local Authority and Housing Association properties.

However, since then, Government subsidy for managing and maintaining social housing has reduced, which means Registered Providers, including those that manage Council owned homes, must find new ways to fund good quality management and maintenance of their existing stock from rental streams and other income.

Government subsidy for developing affordable social homes has also been substantially reduced under the Government’s Affordable Housing Programme 2011- 2015. Under the new programme a new type of tenancy was created called the Affordable Rent Tenancy, which allows Registered Providers to set rents up to 80% of market rents to support the development of new homes in line with national, regional and local priorities. Homes may also be re-let by Registered Providers under the term of an Affordable Rent Tenancy.

Affordable Rent Tenancy Based on Current Market Rents: 2011/2012

Affordable Rent Tenancy Based on Current Market Rents: 2011/12
Enlarge the Affordable Rent Tenancy Based on Current Market Rents graph

Source: Enfield’s Tenancy Strategy 2013-2018

Based on the 2011/12 weekly market rents, an 80% market rent figure would remain well above the rent levels being paid across Local Authority and Housing Association properties. By way of comparison, weekly rent figures for Local Authority and Housing Association properties are currently around 40% - 50% of market rent.

It is worth noting however, that these 80% rents are only applicable to new build properties, and it is not yet certain to what extent Registered Social Landlords will implement this.

Number of Private Sector Renewal Grants Completed: 2008/2009 – 2012/2013

Number of Private Sector Renewal Grants Completed: 2008/09 – 2012/13
Enlarge the Number of Private Sector Renewal Grants Completed graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

Between 2008/09 and 2012/13, the number of private sector renewal grants (grants available for households to repair and improve their homes) awarded by the Council has varied somewhat. From a fairly low number in 2008/09, the number of grants completed peaked in 2010/11 before decreasing the following year, and increasing once more the year after. Mandatory Disabled Facilities Grants have been the most commonly awarded grants each year.

Amount of Private Sector Renewal Grants Awarded: 2008/2009 – 2012/2013

Amount of Private Sector Renewal Grants Completed: 2008/09 – 2012/13
Enlarge the Amount of Private Sector Renewal Grants Completed graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

The total value of those grants that have been awarded has also varied, although to a lesser degree. The value of grants awarded peaked in 2010/11 at 2.21 million, before decreasing slightly to 1.83 million in 2012/13.

Accessible Homes Demand from the Housing Register: 2011 – 2013

Accessible Homes Demand from the Housing Register: 2011 – 2013
Enlarge the Accessible Homes graph

Source: London Borough of Enfield

The number of accessible homes required from households on the housing register has remained fairly constant over the last three years: 2011 a total of 37; 2012 a total of 50; and 2013 a total of 40.

Homes with 2 bedrooms have tended to be the most in demand, with the 25-44 and 45-59 age groups accounting for the majority of requests.

Under Occupation on the Housing Register: 31st December 2012

Under Occupation on the Housing Register: 31st December 2012
Enlarge the Under Occupied Homes on the Register chart

Source: London Borough of Enfield

Not all homes are fully occupied. The above chart shows the number of homes, on the housing register on 31st

December 2012, that were identified as under occupied. Just under three quarters of these homes have one extra bedroom, approximately a quarter have two extra bedrooms, and a small minority have 3 extra bedrooms.

Further information on this topic is available from:

Enfield Housing Strategy: 2012 - 2027

Enfield Tenancy Strategy: 2013 - 2018

This page was last updated on 18-Sep-2015.